Through an open and honest delivery of their story and experiences with spinal cord injury, our speakers hope to promote prevention, minimise risk of injury and encourage students to consider consequences of high risk activities.

With many of our speakers having acquired their injury during their teenage years, we’re confident that their stories will resonate strongly with students. Our speakers have the following in common:

  • a spinal cord injury and use a wheelchair
  • their injuries were a direct result of an accident
  • they had their accident when they were in the high-risk age group (15-24 years old)
  • they all believed an accident would never happen to them
Paul

Paul

One of the things I enjoyed when I was young was riding my BMX. It was a BMX jump gone wrong however that resulted in me becoming a quadriplegic, just four weeks after my 16th birthday. Read more.

Robbie

Robbie

My life changed forever when I was 17, I was involved in a head-on collision between a car and the motorbike I was riding. I was airlifted to hospital in a critical condition. Read more.

Rhiannon

Rhiannon

In 2009, I went on a girls’ holiday to Bali just two weeks before my 21st birthday. The trip became the start of a new life and an unplanned journey for me when I dived into a resort swimming pool and hit the bottom. Read more.

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Josh

In the summer of 2005 just months after I finished my VCE, I was celebrating Australia Day with my mates. We decided to take a road trip to the beach in Port Campbell but we never made it. Read more.

Antonio

Antonio

I was 19 years old when I had my accident. I was driving to work on a cold and wet morning when my car slipped in oil on the road. The car spun out of control. Read more.

Anthony

Anthony

I was 19 when I had an accident on my BMX bike. I’d been riding bikes my whole life, and fallen thousands of times. At first, I thought this time was no different. Read more.

Anthony B

Anthony B

At age 6 while walking home from school I was hit by a car. My injuries included a broken spinal cord, meaning I now can’t breathe on my own, feel or move anything below my neck. Read more.

Meet the speakers